Los Molinos Vagabonds

Los Molinos Vagabonds

Portola Vagabonds

There are some notices posted on the rear of this trailer, some bikes tied up, a barbeque and some gas cans. The writing on the back seems to be a phone number and a warning. I saw one of the people who lived in the trailer walking along the railroad tracks with his pit bull puppies.

Continue reading

Waiting for a Train

Waiting for a Train

Waiting for a Train

The conductor, the brakeman and I waited here in Del Paso for the train heading to Mt. Shasta. We talked about the life they signed on for the railroad; the missed birthdays, anniversaries, holidays, the loss of friends. We also talked about working in the snow and unusual pick-ups in waist high snow in the sheds of the Sierras.

Continue reading

Masonic Temple, Beckwourth

Masonic Temple, Beckwourth

Masonic Temple, Beckwourth

The term Masonic Temple originates in Masonic ritual and tradition. Masonic tradition, as expressed through the fraternity’s ritual, holds that the first Masonic Lodge was formed at the building of King Solomon’s Temple in Jerusalem, and that Freemasons are the philosophical heirs of the operative stonemasons who build it. A Freemason engages in building “a spiritual temple in his heart” a “house not made with hands” that echos the physical temple built by operative stonemasons in Jerusalem.

Continue reading

Mr. James Beckwourth’s Cabin

Mr. James Beckwourth’s Cabin

Mr. James Beckwourth's Cabin

The log cabin built in 1852, by the trapper, explorer and mountain man. According to Wikipedia a Mountain Men were trappers and explorers who roamed the North American Rocky Mountains from about 1810 through the 1880s. They were instrumental in opening up the various Emigrant Trails thus allowing Americans in the East to settle the new territories of the far west by organized wagon trains traveling over roads explored and in many cases, physically improved by the mountain men and the big fur companies originally to serve the mule train based inland fur trade.

Mountain men were ethnically, socially, and religiously diverse, fitting no ready stereotype. While they considered themselves independent they were, in fact, economically an arm of the big fur companies which held annual fairs for the mountain men to sell their wares known as Trapper’s rendezvous.

Continue reading